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Challenges of Treating an Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection With Concurrent Seizure Treatment in a Free Clinic

Treatment

Challenges of Treating an Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection With Concurrent Seizure Treatment in a Free Clinic

Currently, there is limited data evaluating the co-administration of first-generation anticonvulsants for epilepsy treatment and direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. There is a potential risk of suboptimal DAA serum concentrations that could potentially lead to HCV treatment failure. In this report, we describe the case of an uninsured, non-Hispanic Black male in his mid 40s with a history of generalized epilepsy that was managed with phenytoin 100mg twice a day and divalproex 500mg extended-release once daily. He was diagnosed with an acute hepatitis C viral infection with a genotype of 1a. Due to the viral genotype, treatment naivety, and lack of cirrhosis, the recommended treatment is to start glecaprevir/pibrentasvir, but the concomitant use of phenytoin and glecaprevir/pibrentasvir is not recommended due to a drug-drug interaction that could lead to subtherapeutic DAA levels and possible treatment failure. Through shared decision-making and close follow-up, we slowly weaned the patient off phenytoin, replaced it with levetiracetam, and started glecaprevir/pibrentasvir. We successfully eradicated the patient’s HCV infection, and no breakthrough seizures were reported. Although an unprecedented case and with the limited data evaluating the coadministration of DAAs and treatment of acute HCV infection, we were able to successfully treat and achieve full remission of the HCV infection. By virtue of this case report, we hope to encourage others to report similar cases and spread awareness regarding the difficulties in management.

 

Click here to view the full report as a PDF.

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